Posted by: Oscar in Acupuncture,Clinic,Deep Tissue Massage,Massage on May 15th, 2014

 

Acupuncture and Massage Treatments

Clinic Located at 959 East 12th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11230

Call 718 258 1829 for an appointment to eliminate your pain, stress and anxiety

 

Not accepting new appointments. Thank you for your past patronage.

 

Stress Related Issues Muscular, Postural, Nervous and Digestive System Complaints Muscular Aches and Pains, Back, Neck, Shoulder, TMJ Headache, Sinus Congestion Symptoms of Mild Depression and Excess Grief

Oscar Abraham, M.S., L.Ac., L.M.T. has over 15 years experience in the field of pain and stress reduction. He knows from first hand experience that acupuncture and massage help reduce pain, edema and muscular tension caused by trauma, overwork and poor posture.

Acupuncture and Massage treats a wide variety of conditions and maladies besides muscular aches and pains. It is an effective treatment for infertility and other gynecological issues such as menstrual cramps, PMS pain, and menopause conditions. In addition, Acupuncture has been shown to effective in treating IBS,  Crohn’s disease and other GI issues such as diarrhea and constipation. Acupuncture is an effective treatment for many lung conditions such as coughing, asthma and sinus issues.

Our patients will tell our success stories.  See the testimonials page (under construction) for our success stories.

Not accepting new appointments.

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Find us on Facebook – Become a Fan . Acupuncture Methods: Acupuncture needle insertion, retention and manipulation; Electical stimulation of acupuncture points; spot acupuncture; auricular acupuncture; cupping; gua sha; moxibustion; tui na; chi gong; meditation Massage Methods: Swedish massage; Deep Tissue massage; Relaxation Massage; Shiatsu; Tui Na; Accupressure; Pulse Balancing; Hot Stone Massage; Homework: Posture Recommendations; Exercise Recommendations; Referral to other practitioners as necessary. Click this Link to Contact Me. Click This Link for Directions to the Clinic.

Posted by: Oscar Abraham in Acupuncture,Clinic,Deep Tissue Massage,Health,Massage,pain on July 24th, 2011

Stilettos… A Pain In The????
By Erik Dalton, Ph.D.

The biomechanical effect of heels in everything from running shoes to stilettos has puzzled researchers and fired controversy for almost a century. In a highly functioning body, the neuro-myo-skeletal system ‘hangs’ in dynamic equilibrium, each part balancing the other. But when a woman wears high heels, a new dynamic equilibrium occurs (Fig 1) If one body part becomes ‘fixed,’ the whole system must compensate with altered movement patterns resulting in kinetic chain ‘kinks.’ Here’s an interesting experiment that’ll help you get a feel for biomechanical adjustments high-heel wearers deal with every day:

• Stand barefoot with the back against a wall. Observe how your ‘upright’ body column forms a perpendicular line (ninety degree angle) with the floor (Fig 2A).

• Slide a two inch wedge of some kind (phone book, etc.) under both heels and notice that by keeping your body column rigid, you’re forced to tilt forward from ninety to about seventy degrees (Fig 2B).
• Now replace with a three inch heel wedge and straighten up so you’re touching the wall again and feel the dramatic myo-skeletal adaptations that take place. Can you feel your ankles shift from dorsi to plantar-flexion? In this standing posture, the knees are buckled, hips flexed, low back swayed, and the shoulder girdle retracted (Fig 2C). (more…)

Posted by: Oscar Abraham in Acupuncture,Clinic,Deep Tissue Massage,Health,Massage,pain on November 29th, 2010

Watch and listen to this post on xtranormal.com 

A patient states that he has been diagnosed with right sided Arthritis of the Hip. This diagnosis is complete with X-Rays and report which states there is mild osteoarthritis in the hip. He is being medically treated for this and is also self treating himself with expensive supplements. Yet the patient’s pain is still there after four months, he walks with difficulty and has a hard time climbing stairs.

As I look at the patient, I notice that his standing posture is not exactly consistent with hip pain yet he favors his right side while walking. He also states that he was also recently diagnosed with a pinched nerve in his lower back. Upon examining the patient in the prone position, I observe that his lower back muscles are very contracted. As I palpate his back and hip area he states that most of his pain is in the front, not at the side or the back.

I then tested the patient in the supine position. These tests reveal that the right psoas muscle is severely contracted. I then recall that the patient’s standing posture is consistent with unilateral psoas contraction and the whole symptomology is consistent with unilateral psoas contraction. I start the process to release the psoas and ask the patient to walk. The patient reports that while there is still pain, it is much less severe. As Willie Nelson puts it, we are “On the Road Again”.

I guess that the patient originally went straight to X-Ray without meaningful observation or examination. While there certainly is arthritis in the hip (X-rays cannot lie), it is most likely not the cause of pain.

My doctor friend’s son was a medical student at the University of Chicago and interned at a large Manhattan hospital. I first heard this from him. “Physical Examination is dead.” I think this case proves that. It is up to the “Alternative” medicine crowd to keep it alive.

Posted by: Oscar Abraham in Acupuncture,Clinic,Deep Tissue Massage,Fibromyalgia,pain,Tai Chi on August 20th, 2010

From Medscape Medical News

Tai Chi May Be Useful to Treat Fibromyalgia

Laurie Barclay, MD

August 18, 2010 — Tai chi may be a helpful intervention for patients with fibromyalgia, according to the results of a single-blind, randomized trial reported in the August 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

“Previous research has suggested that tai chi offers a therapeutic benefit in patients with fibromyalgia,” write Chenchen Wang, MD, MPH, from Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston, Massachusetts, and colleagues. “…[Tai chi] combines meditation with slow, gentle, graceful movements, as well as deep breathing and relaxation, to move vital energy (or qi) throughout the body. It is considered a complex, multicomponent intervention that integrates physical, psychosocial, emotional, spiritual, and behavioral elements.”

Fibromyalgia was defined by American College of Rheumatology 1990 criteria. Participants (n = 66) were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive classic Yang-style tai chi or a control intervention consisting of wellness education and stretching. In both groups, participants received 60-minute sessions twice weekly for 12 weeks.

Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) score (ranging from 0 – 100) at the end of 12 weeks was the main study outcome, with higher scores indicating more severe symptoms. Secondary outcomes were summary scores on the physical and mental components of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey. To assess durability of the response, these tests were performed again at 24 weeks.

Improvements in the FIQ total score and quality of life in the tai chi group were clinically important. For this group, mean baseline and 12-week FIQ scores were 62.9 ± 15.5 and 35.1 ± 18.8, respectively, vs 68.0 ± 11 and 58.6 ± 17.6, respectively, in the control group. The mean between-group difference from baseline in the tai chi group vs the control group was ?18.4 points (P < .001).

The tai chi group also fared better than the wellness intervention group in physical component scores of the Short-Form Health Survey (28.5 ± 8.4 and 37.0 ± 10.5 for the tai chi group vs 28.0 ± 7.8 and 29.4 ± 7.4 for the control group; between-group difference, 7.1 points; P = .001) and mental component scores (42.6 ± 12.2 and 50.3 ± 10.2 vs 37.8 ± 10.5 and 39.4 ± 11.9, respectively; between-group difference, 6.1 points; P = .03).

These improvements were still present at 24 weeks (FIQ score between-group difference, ?18.3 points; P < .001), with no reported adverse events.

Limitations of this study include lack of double blinding, lack of generalizability because treatment was delivered by a single tai chi master at a single center, and follow-up limited to 24 weeks.

“In conclusion, our preliminary findings indicate that tai chi may be a useful treatment in the multidisciplinary management of fibromyalgia,” the study authors write. “Longer-term studies involving larger clinical samples are warranted to assess the generalizability of our findings and to deepen our understanding of this promising therapeutic approach.”

The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, the American College of Rheumatology Research and Education Foundation Health Professional Investigator Award, and the Boston Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center Research Career Development Award supported this study. The contents of the journal article are solely the responsibility of the study authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine or the National Institutes of Health. Disclosure forms provided by the study authors are available with the full text of the original article here .

N Engl J Med. 2010;363:743-754.

Authors and Disclosures

Journalist

Laurie Barclay, MD

Freelance writer and reviewer, Medscape, LLC

Disclosure: Laurie Barclay, MD, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/727085?src=emailthis

Thanks to Michele Candida Dobbelaere for bringing this article to my attention. Call 718 258 1829 to join a class.